Hubless Wheelchair: Effortless commuting for the physically challenged

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With latest developments in technology, modern designers seems to prefer the minimalistic approach in their designs. Inspired by the hubless motorcycles and bicycles, designer Jonathan O’Conner has designed a ‘hubless wheelchair’ that will make commuting effortless for the physically challenged. Intended for young and active disabled individuals, the hubless wheelchair comes with a supportive mesh fabric seat suspended on a lightweight carbon fiber frame. The pushrim, extends past the tire and connects to the rotating center-free rim, while the outer rim (tire and pushrim) bear down on a non-rotating inner rim that is directly attached to the frame. Hubless wheels not just give a sleek look to the wheelchair, but they also help the user to move freely and briskly without putting too much effort.

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[Thanks Jonathan]

4 thoughts on “Hubless Wheelchair: Effortless commuting for the physically challenged”

  1. This does not look functional. The point of wheel attachment is in the way of the push motion and hands will jam into it- instead of allowing for a full and natural push. It’s also huge- wheelchair users want compact, not bulky!! It limits the ability to wheelie (an essential skill), the footrest does not allow for a relaxed foot position, the back of the chair offers no adjustability with the upholstery, it doesn’t look collapsible in any sense, no adjustability for center of gravity, there is no push rim for the wheels, the wheels and “tires” offer no shock resistance, and you cannot adapt this chair with any modular parts. Looks expensive to start and expensive to fix. Even the Trekinetic would be better than this.

  2. Shayn’s points are very valid. I agree with them a 100%. When I first saw the wheelchair, I thought this is a modern chair in a fancy coffee bar. I would love to use it as such: sitting next a friend who is a wheelchair user in his daily life, so that we BOTH sit on the same type of chair. My friend even thought this is a disability mainstreaming project and named it “Sit next to me!”.
    The device is not safe as well and it feels that the user can not control it: given the fact that his hands are not actively involved in the motion. Positioned like this it looks more like a beach chair and the body weight is balanced in a very strange way. It looks fancy, but at the same time so big as I question how would one put it in a car or get on a bus or even an elevator with it. If one cares for a child and uses it in the same time… this is not very functional again.
    Were people with disabilities consulted in the design process?

  3. Shayn’s points are very valid. I agree with them a 100%. When I first saw the wheelchair, I thought this is a modern chair in a fancy coffee bar. I would love to use it as such: sitting next a friend who is a wheelchair user in his daily life, so that we BOTH sit on the same type of chair. My friend even thought this is a disability mainstreaming project and named it “Sit next to me!”.
    The device is not safe as well and it feels that the user can not control it: given the fact that his hands are not actively involved in the motion. Positioned like this it looks more like a beach chair and the body weight is balanced in a very strange way. It looks fancy, but at the same time so big as I question how would one put it in a car or get on a bus or even an elevator with it. If one cares for a child and uses it in the same time… this is not very functional again.
    Were people with disabilities consulted in the design process?

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